Travels

Unions against Ryanair

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When considering the business of passenger transport by air, there are two options, one the traditional one, which has been followed so far by the flag or ex-state airlines and another that of that pleiad of companies that we include under the concept of low cost (or low cost in its original English). They are two business models that only repeat in a different market what the consumer has already enjoyed, or suffered, in other sectors, such as IT (Dell vs. HP, IBM or Compaq), or food (Dia, Aldi, Lidl, versus El English Court or Marks & Spencer). In Europe, low cost airline is synonymous with Ryanair.


With six signatures on each page, a mixture of opinions, data, considerations, value judgments, suggestions and a list of alleged irregularities committed by Ryanair from the employment contracts to the fuel reserves of its pages are broken down over eight pages appliances How could it be less, the airline did not sit idly by and sent shortly after a response letter, and protests, to the Minister of Development, with a copy among others to Social Security, AENA and the Ministry of Economy and Finance, and signed by Michael O'Leary himself.

I have read both letters but as I am not a pilot, an expert in community law or trade unionist, I am not going to judge the content from that perspective since I lack the appropriate training (but I leave the link to both at the end of the article so that you think about yourselves). Yes, I can say that, since I have been working in Ireland for years, I know the labor legislation in what concerns me and I have to say that, in that respect, some of the allegations of the Spanish unions are inaccurate when not false (and judging by the triumphant and arrogant nonsense, some of Ryanair's response comments seem to have been written by his marketing department and not that of Legal Affairs).

One, who has suffered the illegal price pacts between Iberia and Spanair on the route from Asturias to Madrid, he welcomed EasyJet and his daily flight to London (Stansted) and regretted the cancellation of his Oviedo - Madrid, which left you in an hour in the capital of Spain for little more than the journey of almost five hours with ALSA or RENFE would have cost you.

We talk about Ryanair a lot, and generally not very well, and all of us who board their planes complain about the treatment we receive and how they charge us for almost everything, but that company and others like her we have opened Europe to passengers, although those in Barcelona have to "get off" to Reus or Gerona to get on their planes. And even if Paris or Brussels are an hour by bus when we get off them. The first time I flew from Dublin to Madrid with Aer Lingus it cost me 177 euros a round trip ticket. Today I can do it for half that price with Ryanair.

From the point of view of the consumer, the Irish company should improve, and much, when it comes to customer service, claims and refunds of the ticket price (Michael O'Leary doesn't care that I pay a ticket and then not get on the plane: there is no way to notify him to make that seat available to another, and I recover my money, but he has become a billionaire and I still depend on a payroll, so something will know that I don't know).

When I have to fly from Dublin to any European destination, the first airline I think of is Ryanair and then I check who else flies there, to which airport, and I compare prices, then taking the decision that interests me most according to my circumstances,

I have options because I don't depend on a single airline. Welcome be the competition.

Ryanair | Web with the letter of the unions and the response of the company

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