Travels

Everest glaciers begin to melt

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I read a few minutes ago the news of the Spanish press with the intention of returning soon after an article that I have pending about Lisbon. But when I saw a particular story, I decided to leave the Lisbon theme for later and write about it.

But what happens to us? Yesterday I wrote an article about the possible disappearance of the king penguins and today I find this one about the beginning of a possible end for the glaciers of the Everest. The Everest glaciers! We are not talking about the extinction of a group of insects or the contamination of a lake - which in itself would mean very bad news - but something much stronger: the principle of disappearance of the glaciers of the highest mountains in the world from this planet.

Sherpa Dawa steven, which has crowned the highest peak in the world on more than one occasion, had to turn around in the face of the insecurity it felt when crossing one of the steps surrounded by ice. It creaked more than the bill.

He managed to reach the top, but back in Kathmandu he announced that he would lead an eco-expedition to raise awareness of the effects of climate change on Everest and the rest of the Himalayas.

According to a recent WWF report, in recent years, temperatures on the southern slope of the mountain range (where the largest mountains are found) have experienced an annual increase of 0.6 degrees Celsius.

The expedition evaluate the state of Everest glaciers and will be supported by the United Nations Environment Program, UNEP, and the International Center for Integral Mountain Development, ICIMOD. This body will be responsible for the scientific part, considering the mountains as an excellent laboratory to check the effects of climate change.

Half of the population of the planet depends on the mountains for life and the Himalayan region, in particular, is the main source of water in Asia, with 9 large rivers that are born in it and 1.3 billion people who are supplied by they.

According to the data released by the latest UNEP study, if current warming rates are followed, Himalayan glaciers will see their current extent, estimated at 50 square kilometers, melt until they are reduced to 10 kilometers in 2030.

And while this happens, we, ordinary citizens, continue to put the glass in the green and the paper and cardboard in the blue, thinking that every drop of contribution counts. And it sure is. But we all know that those who have to commit are the mandamases of the governments of this planet. For now, things have improved, but there is certainly a long way to go. Hopefully it is not too late because I would not like to have to resort to Quique's photos to see how those mountains were years ago.

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